- Project Runeberg -  Year-book of the Swedish-American Historical Society / Volume 6 (1916-1917) /
58

(1908-1925) [MARC]
Table of Contents / Innehåll | << Previous | Next >>
  Project Runeberg | Like | Catalog | Recent Changes | Donate | Comments? |   

Full resolution (JPEG) - On this page / på denna sida - Sidor ...

scanned image

<< prev. page << föreg. sida <<     >> nästa sida >> next page >>


Below is the raw OCR text from the above scanned image. Do you see an error? Proofread the page now!
Här nedan syns maskintolkade texten från faksimilbilden ovan. Ser du något fel? Korrekturläs sidan nu!

This page has been proofread at least once. (diff) (history)
Denna sida har korrekturlästs minst en gång. (skillnad) (historik)

acknowledge his supremacy. At the same time he
abandoned and destroyed Fort Nassau, as too far up
the stream, and stationed two men-of-war at his new
fort, which collected toll from foreign vessels trading
in the river. He also attempted to strengthen his
position by obtaining a title to the territory seized by him
from certain Indians, but the right of the latter to
dispose of it was denied by the heirs of the sachem who
had conveyed the land to Minuit, and Printz addressed
a protest on the subject to Stuyvesant. In consequence
of these difficulties with the Hollanders, the Swedish
Governor abandoned all his posts excepting New
Gottenburg, Nya Korsholm and Christina. In other
respects the colony had prospered that year, reaping,
as Printz says, “fine harvests at all the settlements,
besides obtaining delicious crops of several kinds of
fruit.”

No message or letter having been received from
Sweden for the past four or five years, the emigrants
became disheartened, and some of them left the country.
By this time forty Dutch families had settled on
the east side of the Delaware, who sustained
themselves by traffic with the Indians, being poorly
provided for the pursuit of agriculture, in which, on the
other hand, the Swedes excelled.

In April, 1653, the Governor again wrote to the
Chancellor, saying: “The people yet living and
remaining in New Sweden, men, women and children, number
altogether two hundred souls. The settled families do
well, and are supplied with cattle. The country yields
a fair revenue. Still the soldiers and others in the
Company’s service enjoy but a very mean subsistence,
and consequently seek opportunity every day to get

<< prev. page << föreg. sida <<     >> nästa sida >> next page >>


Project Runeberg, Mon Jul 4 09:27:59 2016 (aronsson) (download) << Previous Next >>
http://runeberg.org/ybswedam/6/0060.html

Valid HTML 4.0! All our files are DRM-free